Roland Boutique

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About Roland Boutique

Roland Boutique Series instruments acknowledge the impact Roland has had on music since the 1970s. The fact that entire genres of music have been launched off the back of single Roland machines shows the sheer size of Roland's legacy. The Boutique Series utilizes Roland's Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) technology to accurately capture what is great about machines like the TR-808, TB-303 and D-50. They are then condensed down into their highly portable counterparts - the TR-08, TB-03 and D-05. Featuring most of the same controls and parameters as the originals and recreating their sound with astounding precision, Boutique synths and drum machines bring you access to the phenomenal Roland history without breaking the bank.

Frequently Asked Questions about Roland Boutique

All Roland Boutique instruments feature a built-in speaker with the exception of the SE-02, which is also the only analog Boutique synth.
The Roland D-50 defined the sound of the late 80s with its sample-infused synthesis. The D-50 is the sound behind Enya's Orinoco Flow, Time Stands Still by Rush and the majority of the synth sounds on Michael Jackson's Bad album. In fact, the 'Digital Native Dance' patch alone was a feature of countless pop tracks, including songs by Ashford and Simpson, Guy, Gary Numan, David Lee Roth and D-Train.
The TB-303 was originally designed to accurately emulate a real bass guitar (hint: it didn't). It was soon discontinued and became relatively cheap to buy on the second-hand market. This made it affordable to bedroom producers who gave the 303 new life after discovering that if you twist the Cut Off, Resonance and Envelope knobs while the unit is playing, it produces pretty much the coolest sound ever. Tracks like Acid Thunder by Fast Eddie, We Call It Acieed by D-Mob and Higher State of Consciousness by Josh Wink all feature the 303. We're sure you'll agree that it sounds awesome!
The TR-808 is a major part of the Acid House, Miami Bass, Freestyle and Hip Hop genres. Notable pop songs featuring the 808 include Sexual Healing by Marvin Gaye, Talking Heads' Stop Making Sense version of Psycho Killer, Just Be Good To Me by the S.O.S Band and Whitney Houston's I Wanna Dance With Somebody. The 808s sub-heavy kick sound is still a feature of modern pop songs and many other genres including hip hop, drum and bass and glitch.
The TR-909 is behind the awesome sound of Sussudio by Phil Collins. However, it's probably more recognisable as the drum sound of late 80s and early 90s techno and pop. Tracks like Pump Up the Jam by Technotronic, Vogue by Madonna, No Limit by 2 Unlimited and Out of Space by The Prodigy all have their backbone supplied by the mighty TR-909.